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Perfectly flaky scones that can easily be made into any flavor you’d like including blueberry, cranberry orange, pumpkin, chocolate chip, pumpkin, and cinnamon!

Bird's eye view of British Scones in various flavors. Chocolate Chip scones, Pumpkin Scones, Cranberry Orange Scones, Blueberry Scones, and Cinnamon Scones

Were you wondering what to serve at your next coffee or book club meeting? Look no further. Use this guide to learn how to make the best British scones. In England, these are served at “cream tea” in the late morning, or with afternoon tea. These scones are the best and super easy to make—They’re a fun treat to make as a compliment to your dinner, or a snack between meals to go with a refreshing beverage.

This transatlantic cousin to the biscuit is slightly denser and less sweet. It is complemented with jam and butter (or clotted cream if you want to be super authentic). The most common fruity add-in used in England is sultanas, or golden raisins. You can add-in all kinds of fruits and berries to change up the flavor or make the scones a little sweeter.

This recipe requires less butter than traditional biscuit recipes and will have a slightly denser texture. You will use grated butter to create a biscuit-like dough, but you will use cream in the dough and to brush on top. These scones go great with traditional biscuit or toast toppings, like Apple Butter, jam, honey butter or plain old, delicious butter.

Should I add an egg to my scone batter? What does it do?

It’s a matter of personal preference as to whether or not you add eggs to your scones. Adding an egg to your scone batter will change the texture of your scone, creating a richer, more dense result. This recipe will work either way and the egg is completely optional and does not need to be replaced.

What is the difference between a British scone and a biscuit?

A British scone uses more leavening and less butter than traditional biscuits. They are also made with cream. They end up denser and less sweet than American scones or biscuits.

Grating Butter vs. Pastry Cutter vs.  Food Processor

Scones require a pastry technique where you cut a fat into a flour mixture in order to create a sand-like coarse meal texture. This process provides an even distribution of the cold fat in the recipe. When baked at a high heat this fat will expand quickly, creating a flaky, layered texture in the baked good. There are several different ways to accomplish this. You can use a cheese grater to finely grate your butter, you can use a pastry cutter which is a traditional manual method, or you can use the  S-blade on a food processor and pulse the fat

Can I make the dough in advance?

Yes. This dough freezes nicely to be made in later on. Make the dough and cut into wedges and then, wrap in parchment paper and seal in a freezer bag. To make, thaw the dough and bake as directed.

Flavor Options for Scones

  • Blueberry Scones (1 cup blueberries + 1 teaspoon vanilla extract)
  • Chocolate Chip Scones (1 cup mini chocolate chips)
  • Cranberry Orange Scones (3/4 cup dried cranberries + 2 tablespoons orange zest)
  • Pumpkin Scones (replace half of the heavy cream with 1/2 cup pumpkin puree + 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice)
  • Cranberry Scones (1 cup dried cranberries + 1 teaspoon vanilla extract)
  • Lemon Scones (replace 1/4 cup of the heavy cream with 1/4 cup lemon juice + 2 tablespoons lemon zest)
  • Cinnamon Scones (replace white sugar with brown sugar + 1-2 teaspoons ground cinnamon)

If you like this recipe, here are some other biscuit, scone and roll recipes that might interest you:

Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTube, Facebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

Bird's eye view of British Scones in various flavors. Chocolate Chip scones, Pumpkin Scones, Cranberry Orange Scones, Blueberry Scones, and Cinnamon Scones

Bird's eye view of British Scones in various flavors. Chocolate Chip scones, Pumpkin Scones, Cranberry Orange Scones, Blueberry Scones, and Cinnamon Scones
Perfectly flaky scones that can easily be made into any flavor you’d like including blueberry, cranberry orange, pumpkin, chocolate chip, pumpkin, and cinnamon!
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Ingredients

Scones

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup cold butter
  • 1 large egg (optional)
  • 1 cup heavy cream

Flavoring and Finishing

  • 1 cup fresh blueberries
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream optional
Instructions
  • In a large mixing bowl, stir together flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  • Grate your butter using a cheese grater and stir into the flour mixture OR cut butter into small pieces and use a pastry cutter to cut the fat into the flour mixture until it resembles coarse meal or sand.
  • Add in egg (if using), 1 cup cream, blueberries, and vanilla extract (or other flavorings) stirring until the dough just comes together.
  • Turn the dough out onto a clean countertop and form it into a ball
  • Press the dough flat until it is 2-inch thick circle. Use a butter knife to cut the circle into 8 wedges.
  • Place cut scones on an un-greased baking sheet and brush the tops with 2 tablespoons heavy cream.
  • Bake at 425 degrees for about 12-15 minutes, until the tops are nicely browned.
Notes
Note: Adding an egg to your scone batter will change the texture of your scone, creating a richer, more dense result. This recipe will work either way and the egg is completely optional and does not need to be replaced.
 

MIX INS:

  • Blueberry Scones (1 cup blueberries + 1 teaspoon vanilla extract)
  • Chocolate Chip Scones (1 cup mini chocolate chips)
  • Cranberry Orange Scones (3/4 cup dried cranberries + 2 tablespoons orange zest)
  • Pumpkin Scones (replace half of the heavy cream with 1/2 cup pumpkin puree + 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice)
  • Cranberry Scones (1 cup dried cranberries + 1 teaspoon vanilla extract)
  • Lemon Scones (replace 1/4 cup of the heavy cream with 1/4 cup lemon juice + 2 tablespoons lemon zest)
  • Cinnamon Scones (replace white sugar with brown sugar + 1-2 teaspoons ground cinnamon)

Nutrition

Serving: 1scone | Calories: 387kcal | Carbohydrates: 37g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 25g | Saturated Fat: 15g | Cholesterol: 103mg | Sodium: 199mg | Potassium: 231mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 10g | Vitamin A: 895IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 99mg | Iron: 1.7mg
Course: Bread, Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: British
Keyword: scones

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Amanda Wilson

5 stars
The recipe looks really good – especially with the variations.
In Britain we don’t do our scones as wedges though – we use a cookie cutter to cut out individual round ones. That way you get more from the batch of dough 😀

Beverly j. Butler symonik

Very buttery. I am not a cook so the forming and cutting were very difficult.
End product great!

Paula

5 stars
Best scones ever…grating the butter makes all the difference!! I have made this receipe several times with several of the variations and it is consistently delicious!

Tony Landeen

5 stars
Great recipe !
I have made them twice now and they are delicious!
Fam Fav !

Paul

I would better characterize these as American Scones, which are triangular shaped wedges that are denser and more ingredient filled than their British counterpart, which is round and lighter with no more than currents added and served with Strawberry Preserves and Clotted Cream. At least that is what I’ve observed when traveling within the UK, over that offered in an American Coffee Shop. I’m sure these are good in their own right, just different from an authentic British Scone.

Debra

I made the cranberry-orange scones today and they turned out perfect! Instead of glaze, I sprinkled a little sugar on top. Great recipe. Will definitely make them again!

Cheryl Humbarger

I’ve tried the wonderful cranberry orange as well and found them delicious. For the glaze, I added a little orange marmalade to it, also. Delicious!

Lydine Arriola

5 stars
Amazing recipes! I want to ask how can we make a Banana scone variation?

Lisa Ponte

Can I make them witg dried blueberries or cranberries ?

Thank you! This is an excellent recipe! I will make it over and over. It has excellent flavor, looks beautiful when baked and was very easy to make with common ingredients. My dough was a little wet but I was not an ounce disappointed at how they turned out. My family loved them and I also shared 2 with the neighbor because anything this delicious should be shared with a friend!

JP

5 stars
Made this recipe yesterday. They are moist, flaky and very tasty! I will definitely make these again. They didn’t last long….My family couldn’t stop eating them. No leftovers.
My dough was real sticky and hard to handle. I was afraid to add more flour but I did and they were still good. I won’t add as much liquid at first next time and see what happens.

Today I made cranberry white chocolate scones! I put in 1/2 cup of each. YUMM!

Dorothy Young

5 stars
Oh my goodness they were so delish. The first batch didn’t last very long. So guess what, I made another batch.
Excellent results.!!
We have no evidence of the scones because they are all gone.
Thank you for this recipe. It served my household well.

Shannon Brayton

5 stars
So easy to make! I made blueberry and cinnamon. The butter part was tricky in my food processor. Even after putting the butter in the freezer it formed into a ball. Very tasty!!!

Mary Ellen Thomson

I made the chocolate chip scones but they flattened out as they baked and lost their shape. Anyone know what I did wrong?? Maybe not mix them enough? Almost seemed like they were became a little runny as they were baking but still tasted good.

Monica

On another recipe,someone said their scones flattened out because they were cooking on too low of a temperature. Also,that’s one of the reasons the butter has to be absolutely cold. If it’s set out too long while you’ve been preparing them,it’s best to put them in the freezer for about 5 minutes before baking. I’ve made scones at least 12 times in the past month. I have a banana walnut recipe that I make often and it’s mostly done in a food processor. So, I chill them before making. They are described as tasting like “eating a piece of warm… Read more »

Valerie Forney

5 stars
Bet you can’t eat just one!!!

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